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Election Administration in Colorado

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Election Types and Dates

Election Dates

Upcoming Primary Elections

The presidential preference causes for the Democratic and Republican parties will be held on March 1, 2016. The primary election for other offices will be held on June 28, 2016. The general election will be held on November 8, 2016.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-10)

Colorado 2016 Election Calendar [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-3-102 [link]

Upcoming General Elections

The general election will be held on November 8, 2016.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-10)

Colorado 2016 Election Calendar [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-4-201 [link]

How is a nominee determined?

How is a nominee determined (caucus, primary, convention)?

Major party candidates (Democrats and Republicans) are nominated through primary elections, except for presidential candidates and candidate to fill vacancies to unexpired terms of representatives in congress, which are nominated through conventions. Minor party candidates are nominated through conventions or by petition.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-10)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-4-1304 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-4-502 [link]

Political Party Affiliation

Can voters register by party in the state?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-10)

Colorado Voter Registration Form [link]

Must voters be registered with a political party if they would like to vote on that party’s candidates in a partisan primary election (i.e., are primaries open or closed)?

Yes (closed primary). However, voters not affiliated with a political party can choose to affiliate with one on the day of the primary election at the polls if the voter casts their ballot in person.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-10)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-218.5(2) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-201(2) [link]

When can a voter change or switch their party affiliation?

A voter may change their political party affilication at any time, including on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-10)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-219 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-218.5 [link]

Voter Registration

Who Can Vote?

What are the state's residency requirements for voters?

A person must live in Colorado for at least 22 days immediately before the election in which the person wishes to vote.

Additionally, if a person is homeless, state law says that the mailing address of a homeless individual is that individual’s residence for the purpose of registration or voting, but it cannot be a post office box or general delivery at a post office. When registering to vote, a homeless voter must identify a specific location within a precinct that the voter considers their "home base," which is a place to which the voter returns regularly and manifests an intent to remain, and a place from which the voter can receive messages and be contacted. A home base may include a homeless shelter, a homeless provider, a park, a campground, a vacant lot, a business address, or any other physical location. The home base cannot be a post office box or general delivery at a post office. If the home base does not include a mailing address, then the homeless voter must provide a mailing address. A homeless person who does not have a valid mailing address cannot register to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-01-25)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-101 [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. § 1505-1:2.8(2.8.1, 2.8.2, 2.8.3) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-102(1)(a)(II) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-102(1)(a)(II) [link]

Can someone pre-register to vote if they will not be 18 years old by the next election? If so, who?

Any person who is 16 or 17 years old may pre-register to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-101 [link]

Can 17-year-olds who will be 18-year-olds by the general election vote in the primary?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-101 [link]

Does the state take away the right to vote from persons convicted of certain crimes? If so, what crimes?

Yes, people convicted of felonies lose the right to vote while in prison or on parole. However, people convicted of felonies may vote while on probation.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

Colorado Secretary of State Website [link]

Colo. Const. art. 7, § 10 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. 1-2-103(4) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. 1-2-103(4) [link]

If people lose the right to vote because of a criminal conviction, can they regain the right to vote? How?

After completing a prison sentence and parole, people convicted of felonies regain the right to vote. However, such persons must register to vote, even if they were registered before conviction.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

Colorado Secretary of State Website [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. 1-2-103(4) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-302(3.5)(b) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-302(3.5)(b) [link]

Voter Registration Options

Is fully online voter registration available? (i.e., can voters fill in and submit an online application without printing and signing it?)

Yes, but a person must have a Colorado State driver's license or ID card issued by the Department of Revenue to register online.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-202.5 [link]

Colorado Online Voter Registration [link]

Does the state accept the National Mail Registration Form?

Yes. Click here to download the form.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

National Mail Registration Form [link]

Is the state required to register voters at public assistance agencies and driver's license agencies, per the National Voter Registration Act of 1993?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

U.S. Department of Justice website [link]

Student-Specific Rules

Does the state have specific rules on students registering to vote or voting?

Students who lived in Colorado before attending a university or college may choose to register to vote either at their previous home address or at their current school address. Students who lived outside of Colorado before attending a university or college in Colorado may register to vote at their school address only if it is their "principal home," which is the place where the student's residence is fixed and the student intends to return to after they leave the home for any length of time. The state can consider the following factors in determining whether a home is a "principal home": the student's business pursuits, employment, income sources, residence for income or other tax purposes, age, marital status, residence of parents, spouse or civil union partner, children, leaseholds, situs of personal and real property, existence of any other home and the amount of time spent at each home, and motor vehicle registration.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

Brennan Center's Colorado Student Voting Guide [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-102 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-103 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-103 [link]

Voter Registration Deadlines

When is the voter registration deadline?

Colorado conducts elections primarily by mail ballot. To receive a mail ballot, a person must register to vote no later than the 8th day before the election; if a person registers to vote after this date, the voter will have to cast a ballot in person on Election Day at a Voter Service and Polling Center. Additionally, different voter registration deadlines apply depending on how a person registers to vote:

  • A person may register in person at a Voter Service & Polling Center any time that the Center is open, which includes Election Day itself
  • A person may register in person at a County Clerk and Recorder's office during any time the office is open and receiving applications
  • If a person registers to vote by mail, by fax, by email, online, through a voter registration agency, through a driver's license examination facility, or through a high school, the application must be submitted at least 8 days before the election (or the next business day, if the 8th day falls on a weekend or holiday)
  • If a person registers to vote through a voter registration drive, the application must be submitted at least 22 days before the election (or the next business day, if the 22nd day falls on a weekend or holiday)
Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-201 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-202 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § (3)(b)(II)(B) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § (3)(b)(II)(B) [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. § 1505-1:2(2.1.4) [link]

How is the deadline enforced for mailed applications?

Postmark - a mailed application will be accepted if it is postmarked by the voter registration deadline. If the postmark is illegible or missing, it will be accepted if it is received by the voter registration daedline.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

8 Colo. Code Regs. § 1505-1:2(2.1.4) [link]

How is the deadline enforced for online applications?

Receipt - An application submitted online, by email, or by fax must be received by 11:59pm on the day of the voter registration deadline.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

8 Colo. Code Regs. § 1505-1:2(2.1) [link]

Voter Registration Drives

Are there restrictions on getting voter registration forms?

Yes. Voter registration drive organizers must use the forms approved by the Secretary of State (including the state and federal forms). Voter registration drive organizers can obtain Colorado Voter Registration Drive Application Forms from County Clerks and the Secretary of State. The Secretary of state approves a standard state form. Voter registration drives may also use the federal form. A VRD organizer must receive a VRD number before her or she can receive the approved Colorado Voter Registration Drive Application Forms. A VRD number is valid until December 31st of the calendar year in which it was approved. VRDs must complete training each year in order to be issued a new VRD number. A voter registration drive organizer that uses a voter registration application form other than the form approved by the Secretary of State shall be punished by a fine not to exceed $500.

Drives may not copy or reproduce the forms in any way.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-25)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-702(1) [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. § 1505-1:14(14.4.1, 14.4.2, 14.4.4) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-703(1) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-703(1) [link]

Colorado Secretary of State's Voter Registration Drive FAQs [link]

Does the state require any training in order to conduct voter registration drives?

Yes. Organizers must fulfill the training requirements established by the Secretary of State. After completing the training, the VRD organizer must complete the training test and answer the questions 100% correctly before the Secretary of State will issue a VRD number. Organizers must complete the training and test every calendar year in which he or she intends to conduct a drive. After completing the training and test, the VRD organizer must sign a Statement of Intent and Training Acknowledgment Form confirming that the training and test have been completed and that he or she was informed of the rules, laws and penalties relating to voter registration drives. Organizers that fail to fulfill the training requirements will be fined an amount not to exceed $500. In addition, the mandatory training provided by the Secretary of State for VRD organizers must include a brief training video that the organizer must show to the circulators as part of the VRD training program.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-25)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-701(2) [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. § 1505-1:14(14.2.2(i), 14.2.4, 14.2.5, 14.2.6) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-703(2) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-703(2) [link]

Does the state have restrictions on who may help others register to vote?

No.

Does the state have restrictions on paying drive workers, or additional rules related to payment?

Yes. Canvassers may not be compensated based on the number of applications distributed or collected, with a fine for violations of this rule up to $1000.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-25)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-702(3) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-703(4) [link]

Are there restrictions on the voter registration drive offering something of value to a person in exchange for completing a voter registration application?

Federal law states that whoever "pays or offers to pay or accepts payment either for registration to vote or for voting shall be fined not more than $10,000 or imprisoned not more than five years." At least one federal appellate court has interpreted "payment" as "intended to include forms of pecuniary value offered or given directly to an individual voter, and indicated the value should be based on "an assessment of the monetary worth of an item from the perspective of the voter receiving the item." That case held that food vouchers could be "payment."

Another example is California's Secretary of State's interpretation of the federal law to mean that "Any type of incentive is considered 'payment,' even things as seemingly innocent as cookies or admission to an entertainment event."

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-25)

52 U.S.C. § 10307(c) [link]

United States v. Garcia, 719 F.2d 99, 102-103 (5th Cir. 1983) [link]

California Secretary of State's Guide to Voter Registration Drives, p. 11 [link]

California Secretary of State's Guide to Voter Registration Drives, p. 11 [link]

Must the registration drive worker sign the completed voter registration application, and must the drive or canvasser place other information on applications?

The drive worker is not required to sign their name; however, the organizer is responsible for placing the VRD number on the application form.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-25)

8 Colo. Code Regs. § 1505-1:14(14.4.3) [link]

Does the state have a rule requiring a receipt or other tracking information to be provided to the applicant?

No.

Are there restrictions on copying completed voter registration applications prior to submitting them to the election official, or other restrictions on data entry or disclosure?

The state's training video for voter registration drive circulators indicates that if a voter registration drive keeps copies of collected forms, it is recommended to black out the confidential information so that it is not legible and do not enter this information into any database. The information the training video indicates is confidential and not subject to disclosure is the social security number, state ID number, driver’s license number, day and month of the date of birth, signature, and email address.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-25)

Colorado Secretary of State's Voter Registration Drive FAQs [link]

Colorado VRD Circulator Training video [link]

Is there a time limit for voter registration groups to submit the voter registration applications they collect?

Yes. Voter registration drives must deliver or postmark completed applications within 15 business days of the applicant’s signature or by the registration deadline for mail applications, whichever is sooner.

Persons other than voter registration drive circulators or voter registration drive organizers who collect a voter registration application from an eligible elector for mailing or delivery to the county clerk and recorder and who fail to mail or deliver the application to the proper county clerk and recorder within 5 business days after the application is signed are guilty of a violation.

The state's online training for voter registration drives indicates that drives should return both federal and state forms to the county for the applicant’s residence.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-25)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-702(2) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13-201 [link]

Colorado Secretary of State's Voter Registration Drive FAQs [link]

Colorado Secretary of State's Voter Registration Drive FAQs [link]

What are the consequences for failing to submit applications on time?

A voter registration drive organizer that intentionally fails to deliver an application on time will be punished by a fine not to exceed $5000.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-25)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-703(3)(c) [link]

Same-Day Registration

Can voters register and vote on the same day (i.e., does the state offer same-day registration)?

Yes, a voter may register to vote and cast a ballot in person on Election Day at a Voter Service and Polling Center.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-201 [link]

Voters Who Have Moved or Changed Their Name

Can people vote if they moved, but did not update their voter registration with their new address?

Yes, voters may update their registration record with their new address by mail or online through the 8th day before the election, or in person at a Voting Service and Polling Center after then, including on Election Day itself.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-216(4) [link]

Can people vote if they have changed their name, but did not update their voter registration with their new name?

Yes, voters may update their registration record with their new name by mail or online through the 8th day before the election, or in person at a Voting Service and Polling Center after then, including on Election Day itself.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-216(4) [link]

Language, Literacy, and Disability Access

Language and Literacy Access

Does the state have any places that must provide election materials in languages other than English, per Section 203 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965?

Yes, the following counties must provide election materials in Spanish:

  • Costilla County
  • Denver County
  • Rio Grande County
Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

Voting Rights Act Amendments of 2006, Determinations Under Section 203, 76 Fed. Reg. 63602 (Oct. 13, 2011) [link]

Does the state have any other rules about providing election materials in languages other than English?

No, except that under state law, ballot issue notices and initiative petitions do not have to be provided in languages other than English.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-40-114 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-905.5(2) [link]

Who can help a voter with reading assistance or translation if they can't vote on their own?

Under Section 208 of the federal Voting Rights Act, any voter who requires assistance to vote due to inability to read or write may be given assistance by a person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer, an agent of that employer, or an officer or agent of the voter's union.

Under state law, if a voter is unable to read or write or has difficulties with the English language, the voter may be assisted by an election judge or another person of the voter's choice who signs an affirmation of assistance.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

52 U.S.C. § 10508 (federal law) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-111 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-607 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-607 [link]

Disability Access

Who can help a voter with a disability if they can't vote on their own?

Under Section 208 of the federal Voting Rights Act, any voter who requires assistance to vote due to a disability may be given assistance by a person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer, an agent of that employer, or an officer or agent of the voter's union.

Under state law, if a voter is unable to read or write or has difficulties with the English language, the voter may be assisted by an election judge or another person of the voter's choice who signs an affirmation of assistance.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

52 U.S.C. § 10508 (federal law) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-111 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-607 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-607 [link]

Does the state have other rules related to access for persons with disabilities?

In-person polling locations and voting equipment must be accessible to people with disabilities. Additionally, no person can be denied the right to vote because they have a mental disability.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-5-703 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-504.5 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-5-102.9 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-5-102.9 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-5-705 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-5-704 [link]

Early Voting, Absentee Voting, and Other Ways to Vote

Vote-by-Mail

Does the state provide mail ballots to all voters without a request?

Yes, all voters who registered to vote at least 8 days before Election Day will receive a ballot in the mail for all federal, state, and county elections, and for all local government elections where the local government decided to conduct mail elections. Voters can either return their ballot by mail or submit their ballot in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center, at the office of the County Clerk and Recorder, or at a ballot drop-off location. If a voter registered to vote within 7 or fewer days before an election, the voter must cast a ballot in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center.

Local governments other than counties may choose to conduct their local elections in person rather than by mail; voters will not automatically receive mail ballots for these elections.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-11)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-5-401 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-104 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-107(4) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-107(4) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-201 [link]

Early Voting/Absentee In-Person Voting

Does the state have early voting/absentee in-person voting?

Colorado conducts most of its election by mail; however, a voter may cast their mail ballot in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center before Election Day.

For local governments that do not conduct their elections by mail, voters may go to the office of their local government's designated election official to request an absentee ballot and then cast the ballot in person at the office.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-14)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-107.2(1) (mail elections) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-5-102.9(2) (mail elections) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1002 (non-mail local elections) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1002 (non-mail local elections) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1006(1) (non-mail local elections) [link]

Where does early voting/absentee in-person voting take place?

Voters who wish to cast their mail ballots before Election Day in person should do so at a Voting Service and Polling Center.

Voters who wish to vote early in local government elections that do not conduct their elections by mail should do so at the office of the local government's designated election official. Voters should contact the local government to learn where this office is located.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-14)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-107.2(1) (mail elections) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-5-102.9(2) (mail elections) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1002 (non-mail local elections) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1002 (non-mail local elections) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1006(1) (non-mail local elections) [link]

When does early voting/absentee in-person voting take place?

Each Voting Service and Polling Center must be open during the 15 days before Election Day, except Sundays. During this time, voters may deliver their completed mail ballots to the Center in person.

For local governments that do not conduct their elections by mail, voters may request and cast absentee ballots in person at the designated election official's office when absentee ballots become available. Voters should contact their designated election official's office for further details.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-14)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-107.2(1) (mail elections) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-5-102.9(2) (mail elections) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1002 (non-mail local elections) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1002 (non-mail local elections) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1006(1) (non-mail local elections) [link]

What official chooses early voting/absentee in-person voting locations?

Voting Service and Polling Centers are chosen by the County Clerk and Recorder.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-14)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-5-102.9 [link]

Are lists of early voters/absentee in-person voters published? How?

Yes, these lists are public records that may be requested from the County Clerk and Recorder or, for local governments that do not coordinate their elections with the county, from the local government's designated election official.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-14)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1004(1) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-106.5 [link]

Absentee Voting by Mail

Can anyone vote absentee by mail without an excuse? If not, what excuses allow a voter to vote absentee by mail?

All voters who registered to vote at least 8 days before Election Day will automatically receive a ballot in the mail for all federal, state, and county elections, and for all local government elections where the local government decided to conduct mail elections. Voters can either return their ballot by mail or submit their ballot in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center, the office of the County Clerk and Recorder, or a ballot drop-off location. If a voter registered to vote within 7 or fewer days before an election, the voter must obtain and cast a ballot in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center.

Local governments other than counties may choose to conduct their local elections in person rather than by mail; voters will not automatically receive mail ballots for these elections. However, these local governments must still allow all voters to request and cast an absentee ballot by mail.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-14)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-104 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-107(4) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-201 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-201 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1002 [link]

Deadline to apply for absentee ballot by mail

For most elections, voters who registered to vote at least 8 days before Election Day will automatically receive a ballot in the mail.

For local government elections that are not conducted by mail, voters must request an absentee ballot no later than the Friday before Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-14)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1002(1)(b) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-201(4) [link]

How does a voter apply for an absentee mail ballot?

For most elections, voters who registered to vote at least 8 days before Election Day will automatically receive a ballot in the mail.

For local government elections that are not conducted by mail, voters may request, either orally or in writing, an absentee ballot application from the local government's designated election official. The voter must then complete the application and either sign the application or make their mark if they cannot sign the application and have the mark witnessed by another person. Alternatively, a family member (related by blood, civil union, marriage, or adoption) can sign the application. The application must then be returned to the office of the designated election official by the deadline. Additionally, a voter can indicate on the application that they wish to apply for "permanent absentee ballot status," and they will then automatically be sent absentee ballots for all future elections conducted by that local government.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-14)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1002 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1003 [link]

Does a voter need to submit any supporting documentation or verification with an absentee mail ballot or absentee mail ballot application? If so, what is required?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-14)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-104 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-201 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1002 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1002 [link]

Are there restrictions on who may request or turn in an absentee mail ballot application for a voter?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-15)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1002 [link]

Deadline to return absentee ballots

For most elections, mail ballots must be received by 7:00pm on Election Day. Mail ballots may be returned through the mail or dropped off in person at a Voting Service and Polling Center, the office of the County Clerk and Recorder, or a ballot drop-off location, all of which are open until 7:00pm on Election Day.

Similarly, for local governments whose elections are not conducted by mail, absentee ballots must be received by the local government's designated election official by 7:00pm on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-15)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1006 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-107(4) [link]

Are there restrictions on who may return a voter's absentee mail ballot for them?

For most elections, a voter can designate any person to return their ballot for them, except that no person (other than an election official) can be designated to return ballots for more than 10 voters.

For local governments elections that are not conducted by mail, there are no restrictions on who a voter may designate to return their absentee ballot for them.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-15)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1006 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-107(4)(b)(I)(B) [link]

Are there any special emergency rules that allow a voter to vote absentee by mail if they are unable to make it to the polls at the last minute?

For local government elections that are not conducted by mail, a voter may request an emergency absentee ballot if the voter is confined to a hospital or their home on Election Day because of conditions that arose after the absentee ballot application deadline. The voter must sign and submit a written request for an emergency absentee ballot to the local government's designated election official. The designated election official will then deliver an emergency absentee ballot to an authorized representative of the voter. The voter may designate a person as an authorized representative by signing a written statement that contains the voter's name, address, and instructions designating a person as the voter's authorized representative, including that person's name and address. The authorized representative must also have a written statement from the voter's physician, advanced practice nurse, or practitioner that says the voter will be confined to a hospital or their home on Election Day. Upon receiving the emergency absentee ballot from the designated election official, the authorized representative must sign a statement saying they received the ballot and provide their written name and address on the statement. The authorized representative must then deliver the emergency absentee ballot to the voter. The ballot must be returned to the designated election official by 7:00pm on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-15)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1011 [link]

Are lists of people who vote absentee by mail published? How?

Yes, these lists are public records that may be requested from the County Clerk and Recorder or, for local governments that do not coordinate their elections with the county, from the local government's designated election official.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-15)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1004(1) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-106.5 [link]

Presidential-only ballots

Under federal law, any registered voter who moves out of the state after the 30th day before a Presidential election may vote for President and Vice President either in person at the voter's previous state of residence or using an absentee ballot from the voter's previous state of residence.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-15)

52 U.S.C. § 10502(e) [link]

Absentee Voting for Military and Overseas Voters

Who is eligible for military/overseas absentee voting?

The following "military voters," and their spouses/civil union partners and dependents, may cast a military-overseas absentee ballot if they are residents of Colorado but are stationed outside of Colorado on active duty:

  • A member of the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard;
  • A member of the Merchant Marine, Commissioned Corps of the Public Health Service, or the Commissioned Corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the United States;
  • A member of the National Guard on activated status.

Additionally, "overseas voters" who live outside of the United States may cast a military-overseas absentee ballot if they meet any one of the following criteria:

  • Before leaving the United States, the voter was last eligible to vote in Colorado; or
  • Before leaving the United States, the voter would have been last eligible to vote in Colorado had the voter then been of voting age; or
  • The voter was born outside the United States and the last state where a parent, legal guardian, spouse, or civil union partner of the voter was eligible to vote before leaving the United States (or would have been eligible if they had been of voting age) was Colorado.
Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-15)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-8.3-102 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-8.3-108 [link]

How do voters apply for a military/overseas ballot?

Overseas and military voters who have a Colorado driver's license or equivalent state ID may apply for a military-overseas ballot by using the online voter registartion portal at www.GoVoteColorado.com. All military and overseas voters can apply for a military-overseas ballot by submitting a Federal Postcard Application (FPCA) or, for local governments that do not conduct their elections by mail, by using the local government absentee ballot application process (described above in the "Absentee Voting by Mail" section).

Additionally, a military or overseas voter in a "hostile fire zone" (as declared by the U.S. Secretary of Defense) may provide to an officer, either verbally or in writing, the information required to apply for a ballot, and the officer may submit an application for a ballot on behalf of the voter. A county clerk and recorder must accept an unsigned federal postcard application or an unsigned letter of application for a ballot if the officer submits with the application a signed statement that the voter in a hostile fire zone provided to the officer, either verbally or in writing, the information required to apply for a ballot.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-15)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-8.3-108 [link]

Colorado Secretary of State website [link]

Deadline to apply for a military/overseas ballot

If a voter wishes to receive their military-overseas ballot by mail, the application must be received by the 7th day before Election Day (but note that 7 days may not be long enough for a vote to receive and return their ballot by the ballot return deadline). If a voter wishes to obtain the ballot by fax or email, the application should be received by the Friday before Election Day. Alternatively, a voter who has previously notified their County Clerk and Recorder that they are a military or overseas voter may download a military-overseas ballot online at www.govotecolorado.everyonecounts.com.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

Colorado Secretary of State's website [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-8.3-109 [link]

Deadline to return the military/overseas ballot

The ballot must be mailed by 7:00pm on Election Day and received by election officials no later than the 8th day after Election Day. However, if the voter reasonably determines that the ballot will not be received by elections officials by the 8th day after Election Day, or if the election is a recall election, then the voter may instead return the ballot by fax or email, so long as the fax or email is sent by 7:00pm on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

8 Colo. Code Regs. § 1505-1:16 [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. § 1505-1:16 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-8.3-111 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-8.3-113 [link]

Who is eligible to use a write-in absentee ballot? How does it work?

Any military or overseas voter may use a Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot. The voter may write in the name of a candidate for an office that they wish to vote for or a political party for that office, in which case the candidate of that political party will be voted for.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-8.3-112 [link]

On Election Day

Where do you vote in person?

Where do you vote in person?

Voters who have automatically received a mail ballot can drop off their mail ballot in person on Election Day at a Voting Service and Polling Center, the office of the County Clerk and Recorder, or a ballot drop box. Voters who have not received a mail ballot may obtain a ballot and cast it in person at a Voting Service and Polling Center.

For local government elections that are not conducted by mail, voters should contact their local government's designated election official to learn the location of their polling place.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-504 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-107(4) [link]

What hours are the polls open on Election Day?

What hours are the polls open on Election Day?

From 7:00am to 7:00pm. People waiting in line to vote at 7:00pm are allowed to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-101 [link]

In the Voting Booth

Are there rules about what materials a voter can and cannot bring into the voting booth?

Voters may not distribute campaign materials or bring liquor into a polling place. Voters are allowed to display the American flag at a polling place.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13-714 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13-715 [link]

Can a voter bring children into the voting booth with them?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-11)

Interview with the Colorado Secretary of State's office. [link]

Are employers required to give employees time off to vote?

Are employers required to give employees time off to vote?

Yes, an employer must give employees at least 2 paid hours off to vote on Election Day without penalty, except for employees whose work schedules provide at least 3 hours of time when the polls are open that they are not on the job.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13-719 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-102 [link]

Campaigning, Electioneering, and Recording Devices

Are there restrictions on campaigning/electioneering during early voting/absentee in-person voting?

People cannot campaign within 100 feet of the building in which early voting is taking place.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13-714 [link]

Are there restrictions on campaigning/electioneering on Election Day?

People cannot campaign within 100 feet of the building in which the polling place is located.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13-714 [link]

Can a voter wear a button or t-shirt with a candidate's name or logo on it into the polling place when they vote?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13-714 [link]

*NEW 1** Can a voter use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) inside the polling place or voting booth?

A voter may not take share a picture of a marked ballot. In addition, some county clerks do not permit cameras, cell phones and other electronic devices inside the polling place.

Source (confirmed on: 10/7/2016)

C.R.S. § 1-13-712 [link]

Colorado Secretary of State, Election Day FAQs [link]

*NEW 2** Can a voter use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) outside the polling place but within the zone around the polling place where campaigning/electioneering is banned?

State law does not address this issue. Local practices may vary.

Source (confirmed on: 10/7/2016)

C.R.S. § 1-13-713 [link]

Colorado Secretary of State Website - Election Day FAQs [link]

Who's at the Polls?

Can persons other than election workers observe inside the polls?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-108 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-105 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-106 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-106 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-107 [link]

What are observers inside the polls called in the state?

Watchers.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-108 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-105 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-106 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-106 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-107 [link]

Does the state establish requirements to observe inside the polls?

Yes. For all elections, a watcher must be an eligible voter, and neither a candidate nor a family member of a candidate can be a watcher for that candidate.

For primary elections, the chairperson of each participating political party may appoint one watcher to each precinct in the county. Additionally, each candidate may appoint one watcher to each precinct in which the candidate appears on the ballot. To the extent possible, the chairpersons and candidates must submit the names of their appointed watchers, using forms provided by the County Clerk and Recorder, by the Friday before Election Day.

For general elections and congressional vacancy elections, each political party or issue committee that has a candidate or issue on the ballot, and each unaffiliated and write-in candidate, may appoint one watcher to each Voting Service and Polling Location in the county and each location that ballots are counted. The chairperson/authorized official of each political party and issue committee, and each unaffiliated or write-in candidate, should to the extent possible submit the names of their appointed watchers, using forms provided by the County Clerk and Recorder, by the Friday before Election Day.

For nonpartisan elections, and for local government elections that are not coordinated with the county, candidates and issue committees that have issues on the ballot may appoint one watcher to each location where that candidate or issue appears on the ballot. To the extent possible in nonpartisan elections, the candidates and ballot committees must submit the names of their appointed watchers, using forms provided by the County Clerk and Recorder, by the Friday before Election Day. For local government elections that are not coordinated with the county, the names must be submitted to the local government's designated election official.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-108 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-105 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-106 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-106 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-107 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-602 [link]

*NEW 3* Can a poll observer use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) in the polling place?

State law does not address this issue. Local practices may vary.

Source (confirmed on: 10/9/2016)

C.R.S. § 1-13.5-602(3)(f) [link]

Are there other rules on what poll observers can or cannot do?

For most elections, each watcher has the right to maintain a list of people who have voted, to witness and verify each step in the conduct of the election from before the opening of the polls through the completion of the vote count and announcement of the election results, to challenge ineligible voters, and to assist in the correction of discrepancies. Watchers may not:

  • Attempt to determine how any person voted, attempt to review confidential voter information, or disclose or record any confidential voter information observed;
  • Use a mobile phone or other electronic device to make or receive a call in any polling location or other place election activities are conducted;
  • Use any electronic device to take or record pictures, video, or audio in any polling location or other place election activities are conducted;
  • Disclose any results before the polls are closed;
  • Write down any ballot numbers or any other identifying information about the voters;
  • Touch or handle the official signature cards, ballots, mail ballot envelopes, provisional ballot envelopes, voting or counting machines, or machine components;
  • Personally interrupt or disrupt the processing, verification, and counting of any ballots or any other stage of the election;
  • Interfere with the orderly conduct of any election process, including issuance of ballots, receiving of ballots, and voting or counting of ballots;
  • Interact with election judges except for the supervisor judge.

For local government elections that are not coordinated with the county, watchers cannot write down any information that could identify a voter, handle any ballots or equipment, or bring into the polling place any cell phone, camera, recording device, laptop, tablet, or other electronic data capture device.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-108 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-602 [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. § 1505-1:8 [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. § 1505-1:8 [link]

Provisional Voting and Voters at the Wrong Polling Place

When should a voter be offered a provisional ballot?

Under Section 203 of the federal Help America Vote Act of 2002, if a person claims to be a registered voter in the jurisdiction in which the person desires to vote and the person claims to be eligible to vote in a federal election, but the person’s name does not appear on the official list of eligible voters for the polling place or an election official asserts that the person is not eligible to vote, then that person must be allowed to cast a provisional ballot at that polling place. The person may cast the provisional ballot after executing, before an election official at the polling place, a written affirmation stating that the person is (1) a registered voter in the jurisdiction, and (2) eligible to vote in that election.

Additionally, any person who votes in a federal election as a result of a federal or state court order, or any other order extending the time established for closing the polls by a state law in effect 10 days before the date of that election, may only vote in that election by casting a provisional ballot. Any such ballot cast must be separated and held apart from other provisional ballots cast for different reasons.

Under state law, a person should be offered a provisional ballot if the person claims to be an eligible and registered voter but their eligibility or registration cannot be determined by election officials. A provisional ballot must also be offered to a person who votes in person without providing a proper form of ID (see section below on Voter ID and Challenges for more information). Additionally, if a voter's eligibility to vote is challenged and the voter refuses to answer the questions asked of them, refuses to sign the challenge form, or refuses to take the required oath, the voter must be offered a provisional ballot (see section below on Voter ID and Challenges for more information).

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

52 U.S.C. § 21082 (federal law) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-8.5-101 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-110(4) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-110(4) [link]

If a voter casts a provisional ballot at the wrong precinct, will the ballot be counted?

Yes, so long as the voter casts the ballot in the county where they are registered to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

Colorado Secretary of State's website [link]

Following up on a provisional ballot

If a voter casts a provisional ballot because did not show acceptable ID, then the voter must provide acceptable ID to the County Clerk's office no later than the 8th day after Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-04)

8 Colo. Code Regs. § 1505-1:17.2.7 [link]

Finding out if a provisional ballot was counted

After casting a provisional ballot, the election official will give the voter a receipt that describes how the voter can learn whether their provisional ballot was counted, such as by calling a toll-free number or visiting a website. Information on whether the provisional ballot counted may not be available until 10 days after a primary election and 14 days after other elections.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-8.5-104(6) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-8.5-111 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-8.5-105 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-8.5-105 [link]

Ballot Shortages/Voting Machine Malfunctions

What is the law or procedure on emergency ballots if a polling place runs out of printed ballots? Are handwritten/photocopied ballots allowed?

If a polling place runs out of ballots, poll workers may distribute unofficial printed or handwritten ballots to voters until official substitute ballots arrive from the designated election official.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-12-16)

Col. Rev. Stat. § 1-5-411 [link]

What is the law or procedure on emergency ballots if a voting machine breaks or malfunctions?

Each county must develop emergency contingency plans for voting equipment and voting locations. If a voting machine breaks at a Voter Service and Polling Location, election official, another machine at the Voter Service and Polling Center must be available for voters to use, or the voter may cast an in-person paper ballot or take a mail ballot packet home. As a last resort, voters may cast provisional ballots. (See Election Rules 7, 17, and 20.10) Colorado sees very few provisional ballots. As an example, in the 2014 General, there were fewer than 1,000 of them statewide.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-11)

Interview with Colorado Secretary of State's office [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-5-501 [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. 1505-1:7 [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. 1505-1:7 [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. 1505-1:17 [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. 1505-1:20.10 [link]

Voter ID and Challenges

Voter ID

Who must show ID to vote?

All voters who vote in person at a Voting Services and Polling Center must show an acceptable form of ID. If a voter does not show an acceptable ID, the voter can cast a provisional ballot.

Additionally, people who registered to vote by mail and are voting for the first time in a particular Colorado county must provide a copy of an acceptable ID with their mail ballot if they did not provide with their voter registration application at least one of the following: (1) the voter's Colorado driver's license number or Colorado state identification card number; (2) if the voter has neither a Colorado driver's license nor a Colorado state identification card, then the last four digits of the voter's Social Security number; or (3) if the voter has none of the above, then a copy of an acceptable ID.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-04)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-110(1) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-107(3.5) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-501(1.5) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-501(1.5) [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. 1505-1:2.3 [link]

Colorado Secretary of State's website [link]

Are there any special requirements for first-time voters?

Yes. People who registered to vote by mail and are voting for the first time in a particular Colorado county must provide a copy of an acceptable ID with their mail ballot if they did not provide with their voter registration application at least one of the following: (1) the voter's Colorado driver's license number or Colorado state identification card number; (2) if the voter has neither a Colorado driver's license nor a Colorado state identification card, then the last four digits of the voter's Social Security number; or (3) if the voter has none of the above, then a copy of an acceptable ID.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-04)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-107(3.5) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-501(1.5) [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. 1505-1:2.3 [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. 1505-1:2.3 [link]

What ID is acceptable?

The following are acceptable forms of ID:

  • A valid Colorado driver's license
  • A valid identification card issued by the Department of Revenue
  • A valid U.S. passport
  • A valid employee identification card with a photograph issued by entity of the federal or Colorado government, or by any local government (county, city, etc.) in Colorado.
  • A valid pilot's license issued by the federal aviation administration or other authorized agency of the United States
  • A valid U.S. military identification card with a photograph
  • A copy of a "current" utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that shows the name and address of the voter. (Note: for a utility bill to be "current," it must have been issued in the last 60 days, unless the billing cycle for that utility is longer than 60 days.)
  • A valid Medicare or Medicaid card
  • A certified copy of a U.S. birth certificate issued in the United States
  • Certified documentation of naturalization
  • A valid student identification card issued by a Colorado institute of higher education that contains a photograph of the eligible voter
  • Verification that a voter is a resident of a group residential facility
  • Verification that a voter is a person committed to the department of human services, confined, and eligible to vote.
  • A Certificate of Degree of Indian or Alaskan Native Blood
  • A letter from the director or administrator of a group residential facility that indicates that the voter is a resident of the facility andresides at the street address listed in Colorado's voter registration system
  • A division of youth corrections identification card issued by Department of Human Services.

Note: If an ID shows the voter's address, that address must be in the state of Colorado to be valid.

The following documents are NOT acceptable ID:

  • Any document produced by Colorado's voter registration system
  • A driver's license or identification card issued to a person who is residing in Colorado not lawfully or temporarily lawfully.
Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-1-104(19.5) [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. 1505-1:2.3 [link]

Colorado Secretary of State's website [link]

Colorado Secretary of State's website [link]

Is a student ID an acceptable form of identification?

Yes, so long as it is a valid student identification card issued by a Colorado institute of higher education that contains a photograph of the eligible voter.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-1-104(19.5)(a)(XI) [link]

Does the address on the ID have to match the address at which the voter is registered?

No, but if the ID shows an address, that address must be in the state of Colorado.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-1-104(19.5)(b) [link]

Colorado Secretary of State website [link]

If a voter has no ID, are there alternatives such as an oath or witness?

A voter who does not show an acceptable ID when voting in person at a Voting Services and Polling Center must vote a provisional ballot. The voter must then provide to the County Clerk's office an acceptable ID within 8 days after the election, or the provisional ballot will not be counted.

For those first-time voters who are required to submit a copy of acceptable ID when voting by mail, the voter may instead to choose to submit their ballot by mail without the copy of acceptable ID so long as the voter provides to the County Clerk's office an acceptable ID within 8 days after the election.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-8.5-101 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-110(4) [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. 1505-1:17.2.7 [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. 1505-1:17.2.7 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-107(3.5)(d) [link]

Challenges to Voters at the Polling Place

Who can challenge a voter at the polling place?

An election judge, a poll watcher, or an eligible voter in that precinct (or an eligible voter in the local government's jurisdiction, if the election is a local government election not coordinated with the county.) Challenges can be made in person against voters who cast their ballot (either regular or provisional) in person at a Voting Service and Polling Center (or local government voting location) or against voters who cast their ballots by mail.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-9-208 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-9-208 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-9-207 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-9-201 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1202(2) [link]

What are the allowed reasons on which a voter can be challenged at the polling place?

If casting a ballot in person, a voter can be challenged as being ineligible to vote for any reason, such as:

  • The voter is not a U.S. citizen
  • The voter has not lived in the state or precinct for at least 22 days immediately before the election
  • The voter is not at least 18 years old
  • The voter has already cast a ballot in the election

If the challenged voter is casting a provisional ballot or casting a ballot by mail, their ballot will not be counted only if the challenge successfully shows at least one of the following:

  • The affidavit on the provisional ballot envelope or returned mail ballot envelope is incorrect or incomplete
  • The signature on the returned mail ballot envelope is a forgery of a deceased person's signature
  • The voter has already cast a ballot in the election
Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-9-201 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-9-203 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-9-204 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-9-204 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1202 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1204 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1205 [link]

Is there a requirement for the challenger to provide cause or evidence?

A challenge must include the "specific factual basis for the challenge" and be signed by the challenger under penalty of perjury.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1203 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-9-202 [link]

How does a voter defend their eligibility to vote if they are challenged?

For challenges made against voters who are casting their ballots in person, an election judge will ask the voter a series of questions concerning the voter's eligiblity, such as questions about the voter's age, address, and citizenship status. If the voter answers these questions satisfactorily and swears under oath that they are eligible to vote, the voter can cast a regular ballot. In most elections, if the voter does not answer these questions satisfactorily, refuses to the answer the questions, or refuses to swear the oath, the voter can cast a provisional ballot. If the election is a local government election not coordinated with a county, and the voter does not answer these questions satisfactorily, refuses to the answer the questions, or refuses to swear the oath, the voter cannot cast a ballot at all.

For challenges against mail ballots, two election judges of different political parties will review the ballot. If one or both determine that the challenge is without merit, the ballot will be counted. If they both determine the challenge is with merit, the County Clerk will mail the voter a a form asking the voter to confirm that they mailed in their ballot, which the voter must sign and return to the County Clerk by the end of the 8th day after the election. The form must be accompanied by a copy of acceptable ID. If the County Clerk receives this form and acceptable ID by the end of the 8th day after the election and the ballot is otherwise valid, it will be counted.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-9-203 (in-person challenges) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-9-204 (in-person challenges) [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. 1505-1:9.1 (in-person challenges) [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. 1505-1:9.1 (in-person challenges) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-9-207 (mail ballot challenges) [link]

8 Colo. Code Regs. 1505-1:9.2 (mail ballot challenges) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7.5-107.3(2) (mail ballot challenges) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1204 (local government elections) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1205 (local government elections) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1206 (local government elections) [link]

What are the restrictions on polling place challenges?

A challenge must be made in writing under oath. If the challenge is made in person, it must be made in the presence of the person who is challenged.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-9-202 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1203 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-1203 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-9-201(3) [link]

State and Local Election Officials

The State Election Authority

Who/what is the state election authority?

Secretary of State

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-1-107 [link]

Current official

Wayne W. Williams

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colorado Secretary of State's website [link]

E-mail

sos.elections@sos.state.co.us

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colorado Secretary of State's website [link]

Phone

303-894-2200

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colorado Secretary of State's website [link]

Address

ATTN: Elections & Voting Colorado Department of State
1700 Broadway, Suite 200
Denver, CO 80290

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colorado Secretary of State's website [link]

Local Election Authorities

What local election official(s) are in charge of major state-level elections (such as the even-year November general elections)?

County clerk and recorder or the election commission (in counties that have an election commission).

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-1-110 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-1-112 [link]

What is the county-level election official?

County clerk and recorder or the election commission (in counties that have an election commission).

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-1-110 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-1-112 [link]

What is the municipal-level election official?

Municipal clerks serve as deputy registrars for the county clerk and recorder. Additionally, In local governments smaller than counties that coordinate their elections with the county, the county clerk and recorder serves as the local government's election official. In local governments that do not coordinate their elections with the county, the local government appoints a designated election official.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-202(2) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-1-110(3) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-103(2) [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-13.5-103(2) [link]

Contact information for local election authorities

Contact information for County Clerks and Recorders can be found here.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Secretary of State's website [link]

The Voter File

Voter File Basics

National Voter Registration Act (NVRA) Disclosure Law

Section 8 of the federal NVRA requires that each State maintain for at least 2 years and make available for public inspection and, where available, photocopying at a reasonable cost, all records concerning the implementation of programs and activities conducted for the purpose of ensuring the accuracy and currency of official lists of eligible voters, except to the extent that such records contain information about a person declining to register to vote or information about the identity of a voter registration agency through which a particular voter might have chosen to register.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

52 U.S.C. § 20507 [link]

Acquiring a Voter File

Under state procedure, who may acquire a voter file?

Any person may request a copy of the voter file using this form.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-510 [link]

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 24-72-203 [link]

Colorado Department of State Data Request Form [link]

Colorado Department of State Data Request Form [link]

Who is the state-level contact for acquiring a voter file?

Secretary of State

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-2-510 [link]

How much does the state charge for the file?

50

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colorado Department of State Data Request Form [link]

Secretary of State's website [link]

What format is the file available in?

The file is available eletronically on a data disc.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-06-05)

Colorado Department of State Data Request Form [link]