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Election Administration in Ohio

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Election Types and Dates

Election Dates

Upcoming Primary Elections

The primary election for president, other federal offices, and state and county offices is March 15, 2016.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-02-22)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.02 [link]

Ohio Const. § 17.01 [link]

Ohio 2016 Elections Calendar [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.01(E) [link]

Upcoming General Elections

The general election for President, other federal offices, and state and county offices is November 8, 2016.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-02-22)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.02 [link]

Ohio Const. § 17.01 [link]

Ohio 2016 Elections Calendar [link]

How is a nominee determined?

How is a nominee determined (caucus, primary, convention)?

Primaries.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

Ohio Const. § 5.07 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3513.01(A) [link]

Political Party Affiliation

Can voters register by party in the state?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.14 [link]

Must voters be registered with a political party if they would like to vote on that party’s candidates in a partisan primary election (i.e., are primaries open or closed)?

Mostly open. A voter may vote the primary ballot of the political party with which they currently wish to be affiliated. However, if a voter wishes to vote a party's ballot different from what their voting record for the current year and the immediately preceding two calendar years as shown on the voter's registration card, they must complete a written statement, under penalty of election falsification, at the polling place confirming the change in their political party affiliation.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3513.19 [link]

When can a voter change or switch their party affiliation?

At the polls on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3513.19 [link]

Voter Registration

Who Can Vote?

What are the state's residency requirements for voters?

A person must live in Ohio for 30 days before Election Day. If a person does not live in a traditional home, but has a shelter or other location at which the person has been a consistent or regular inhabitant and to which the person has the intention of returning, that shelter or other location may be used as the person's residence for the purpose of registering to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-02-22)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.01(A) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.02(A), (I) [link]

Can someone pre-register to vote if they will not be 18 years old by the next election? If so, who?

A 17-year-old can register to vote if they will be 18 by the following November election.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.07 [link]

Can 17-year-olds who will be 18-year-olds by the general election vote in the primary?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.011 [link]

Does the state take away the right to vote from persons convicted of certain crimes? If so, what crimes?

Yes. Any person convicted of a felony is disenfranchised while in jail or prison. Note that among other crimes, two or more convictions of election-related crimes constitutes a felony. Additionally, any person convicted of vote selling is disenfranchised for five years.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

Ohio Rev. Code § 2961.01 (felonies) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3599.02 (vote selling) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3599.39 (second offense) [link]

If people lose the right to vote because of a criminal conviction, can they regain the right to vote? How?

Voting rights for persons convicted of a felony are restored automatically after a person is released from jail or prison, or if the person is placed only on probation or parole. Any person who is convicted of a felony must re-register to vote when eligible.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

http://www.sos.state.oh.us/SOS/elections/Voters/FAQ/voterEligibility.aspx [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 2961.01 (felonies) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.07 (re-registration after cancellation) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.18 (canceling registrations) [link]

Voter Registration Options

Is fully online voter registration available? (i.e., can voters fill in and submit an online application without printing and signing it?)

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.011(A) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.14(A)(6) (signature required) [link]

Does the state accept the National Mail Registration Form?

Yes . Click here to download the form.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

http://www.eac.gov/assets/1/AssetManager/national%20mail%20voter%20registration%20form%20english%20august%2011%202010.pdf [link]

Is the state required to register voters at public assistance agencies and driver's license agencies, per the National Voter Registration Act of 1993?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

http://www.justice.gov/crt/about/vot/nvra/activ_nvra.php [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.09 [link]

Student-Specific Rules

Does the state have specific rules on students registering to vote or voting?

A college student may vote using their Ohio school residence address. When a college student votes from their school address, the school residence is considered to be the place to which the student's habitation is fixed and to which, whenever the student is absent, the student intends to return, and is considered by the student to be their permanent residence at the time of voting.

Source (confirmed on: 1900-01-00)

Ohio Revised Code 3503.02 [link]

Voter Registration Deadlines

When is the voter registration deadline?

The 30th day before an election.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.10(B) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.19 [link]

How is the deadline enforced for mailed applications?

The application must be postmarked by the deadline.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.19(A) [link]

When must a voter make changes to their registration for the changes to be in effect before the person seeks to vote?

If a voter moves within the precinct on or before Election Day, the voter may cast a regular ballot by going to their assigned polling place, completing a change of address form, and providing a current and valid photo ID, military ID, or copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document (other than a notice of voter registration mailed by the board of elections) that shows the voter's name and current address. If a voter has remained within the same precinct but changed their name, the voter may cast a regular ballot after completing a change of name form at their polling place and presenting proof of a legal name change that shows the voter's former and current name.

Voters who have moved to another precinct within the same county but did not update their registration may vote a provisional ballot. To do so, the voter must appear the board of elections office, or another designated location where voters may vote, at any time during regular business hours either (1) between the 28th day before the election (or the 25th day before a presidential primary election) and 12:00pm on the Saturday before the election; or (2) on the Monday before the election. Alternatively, the voter may appear at these places or at their assigned polling place on Election Day itself. There, the voter must complete and sign, under penalty of election falsification, the written affirmation on the provisional ballot envelope, which will serve as an official notice of change of residence. The voter must then vote a provisional ballot using their new address and sign a written statement swearing they have moved and will vote in another location.

Voters who moved to another county but did not update their registration may vote a provisional ballot following the same procedure as voters who moved to a different precinct within the county, except these voters may not update their information at a polling place; if they wish to update their information on Election Day, they must go to the board of elections office or other designated voting location. Different rules apply to people who need to update their information but is unable to appear the board of elections or other designated voting location due to physical disability, illness, or infirmity (see Disability Access section below).

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.16 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.19 [link]

See Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.06 [link]

Voter Registration Drives

Does the state require organizations conducting voter registration drives to register?

No. (Ohio's drive registration laws were enjoined in the court case *Project Vote v. Blackwell, meaning they cannot be enforced.)

Source (confirmed on: 2016-02-22)

Project Vote v. Blackwell, 455 F. Supp. 2d 694, 704 (N.D. Ohio 2006) [link]

Partial Final Judgment, Project Vote v. Blackwell, No. 1:06-cv-01628 (N.D. Ohio Feb. 11, 2008) [link]

Are there restrictions on getting voter registration forms?

No.

Does the state require any training in order to conduct voter registration drives?

No. (Ohio's training requirements were enjoined in the court case *Project Vote v. Blackwell, meaning they cannot be enforced.)

Source (confirmed on: 2016-02-22)

Project Vote v. Blackwell, 455 F. Supp. 2d 694, 703 (N.D. Ohio 2006) [link]

Partial Final Judgment, Project Vote v. Blackwell, No. 1:06-cv-01628 (N.D. Ohio Feb. 11, 2008) [link]

Does the state have restrictions on who may help others register to vote?

Yes. A person who is convicted of a felony, or a person whose plea of guilty to a felony is accepted by the court, cannot help others register to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-02-22)

Ohio Rev. Code § 2961.01(B) [link]

Does the state have restrictions on paying drive workers, or additional rules related to payment?

Ohio has a law that says that no person may receive compensation on a fee-per-registration or fee-per-volume basis for voter registration applications. Further, under this registration drive workers may only be paid on the basis of time worked, and whoever compensates a registration drive worker on a fee-per-registration or fee-per-volume basis is guilty of paying improper compensation for registering a voter. Thel law indicates all of these violations are felonies of the fifth degree. However, the law which also relates to payment for petitions, was enjoined in a court case involving petition circulators. Therefore, the enforcement of this law as related to voter registration is unclear. Organizations should communicate with election officials regarding their compensation programs.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-02-22)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3599.111 [link]

Citizens for Tax Reform v. Deters, No. 1:05-CV-212, 462 F. Supp. 2d 827 (S.D. Ohio Nov. 27, 2006), aff’d, 518 F.3d 375 (6th Cir. 2008) [link]

Are there restrictions on the voter registration drive offering something of value to a person in exchange for completing a voter registration application?

Federal law states that whoever "pays or offers to pay or accepts payment either for registration to vote or for voting shall be fined not more than $10,000 or imprisoned not more than five years." At least one federal appellate court has interpreted "payment" as "intended to include forms of pecuniary value offered or given directly to an individual voter, and indicated the value should be based on "an assessment of the monetary worth of an item from the perspective of the voter receiving the item." That case held that food vouchers could be "payment."

Another example is California's Secretary of State's interpretation of the federal law to mean that "Any type of incentive is considered 'payment,' even things as seemingly innocent as cookies or admission to an entertainment event."

Source (confirmed on: 2016-02-22)

52 U.S.C. § 10307(c) [link]

United States v. Garcia, 719 F.2d 99, 102-103 (5th Cir. 1983) [link]

California Secretary of State's Guide to Voter Registration Drives, p. 11 [link]

Must the registration drive worker sign the completed voter registration application, and must the drive or canvasser place other information on applications?

If the registrant is unable to sign his or her name and has no other legal mark, they should make an ‘X.’ The person who witnessed the making of the ‘X’ must write his or her name beneath the signature line. If the registrant is unable to make an ‘X,’ the person who registers them must sign the application form to attest that the registrant indicated they wanted to register to vote. (There also used to be additional requirements, but they are no longer enforceable because they were enjoined by a court in the case Project Vote v. Blackwell.)

Source (confirmed on: 2016-02-22)

Ohio Secretary of State, Frequently Asked Questions: Voters with Disabilities [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.14(C) [link]

Partial Final Judgment, Project Vote v. Blackwell, No. 1:06-cv-01628 (N.D. Ohio Feb. 11, 2008) [link]

Does the state have a rule requiring a receipt or other tracking information to be provided to the applicant?

Ohio law does not address this issue.

Are there restrictions on copying completed voter registration applications prior to submitting them to the election official, or other restrictions on data entry or disclosure?

Ohio law does not address this issue.

Is there a time limit for voter registration groups to submit the voter registration applications they collect?

Yes. Groups must return forms within ten days of completion, or by the registration deadline, whichever is earlier. If the form was received within 24 hours of the registration deadline, the group has 10 days from the date of receipt to submit it.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-02-22)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3599.11 [link]

What are the consequences for failing to submit applications on time?

A voter registration drive worker who fails to submit voter registration forms on time is guilty of a felony of the fifth degree, unless they have not previously been convicted of election falsification (including previously under this same provision), violation of this law did not cause an applicant to miss a registration deadline, and the violator failed to properly return no more than 49 voter registration forms; in such cases, the violator is guilty of a misdemeanor of the first degree

Source (confirmed on: 2016-02-22)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3599.11 [link]

Same-Day Registration

Can voters register and vote on the same day (i.e., does the state offer same-day registration)?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.19 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.05(A) [link]

Voters Who Have Moved or Changed Their Name

Can people vote if they moved, but did not update their voter registration with their new address?

If a voter moves within the precinct on or before Election Day, the voter may cast a regular ballot by going to their assigned polling place, completing a change of address form, and providing a current and valid photo ID, military ID, or copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document (other than a notice of voter registration mailed by the board of elections) that shows the voter's name and current address.

Voters who have moved to another precinct within the same county but did not update their registration may vote a provisional ballot. To do so, the voter must appear the board of elections office, or another designated location where voters may vote, at any time during regular business hours either (1) between the 28th day before the election (or the 25th day before a presidential primary election) and 12:00pm on the Saturday before the election; or (2) on the Monday before the election. Alternatively, the voter may appear at these places or at their assigned polling place on Election Day itself. There, the voter must complete and sign, under penalty of election falsification, the written affirmation on the provisional ballot envelope, which will serve as an official notice of change of residence. The voter must then vote a provisional ballot using their new address and sign a written statement swearing they have moved and will vote in another location.

Voters who moved to another county but did not update their registration may vote a provisional ballot following the same procedure as voters who moved to a different precinct within the county, except these voters may not update their information at a polling place; if they wish to update their information on Election Day, they must go to the board of elections office or other designated voting location.

Different rules apply to people who need to update their information but is unable to appear the board of elections or other designated voting location due to physical disability, illness, or infirmity (see Disability Access section below).

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.16 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.19 [link]

See Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.06 [link]

Can people vote if they have changed their name, but did not update their voter registration with their new name?

If a voter has remained within a precinct but changed their name, the voter may cast a regular ballot after completing a change of name form at their polling place, board of elections office, or other designated voting location, and presenting proof of a legal name change that shows the voter's former and current name. If the voter does not present such proof, the voter may cast a provisional ballot.

If a voter has both changed their name and changed precincts or counties, the voter may update their name by signing a change of name form during the process for updating their address (see above). Such voters may cast only a provisional ballot.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.16 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.19 [link]

Language, Literacy, and Disability Access

Language and Literacy Access

Does the state have any places that must provide election materials in languages other than English, per Section 203 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-08)

76 Fed. Reg. 63602 (Oct. 13, 2011) [link]

Does the state have any other rules about providing election materials in languages other than English?

No. However, a local board of elections may appoint persons who are fluent in a non-English language to serve as interpreters to assist voters in certain election precincts.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-08)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.221 [link]

Who can help a voter with reading assistance or translation if they can't vote on their own?

Under Section 208 of the federal Voting Rights Act of 1965, any voter who requires assistance to vote by reason of blindness, disability, or inability to read or write may be given assistance by a person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer, an agent of that employer, or an officer or agent of the voter's union.

Under Ohio law, a voter may also request and receive assistance marking their ballot from two election officials of different political parties.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-08)

52 U.S.C. § 10508 (federal law) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.181(F) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.24 [link]

Disability Access

Who can help a voter with a disability if they can't vote on their own?

Under Section 208 of the federal Voting Rights Act of 1965, any voter who requires assistance to vote by reason of blindness, disability, or inability to read or write may be given assistance by a person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer, an agent of that employer, or an officer or agent of the voter's union.

Under Ohio law, a voter may also request and receive assistance marking their ballot from two election officials of different political parties.

Additionally, a voter with a disability who votes an absent ballot due to inability to vote at the polls may request that an absent ballot be personally delivered to the voter (and then returned to the board of elections) by two employees who are members of different political parties. If the absent ballot is delivered by board employees, the voter may request their assistance in completing the absent ballot.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-08)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.24 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.08(A) [link]

52 U.S.C. § 10508 (federal law) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.181(F) [link]

Does the state have other rules related to access for persons with disabilities?

Yes. A voter with a disability who cannot vote at the polls for that reason may apply for an absent ballot. The voter may request either that the ballot be mailed to them or that it be personally delivered (and returned) by two board employees who are members of different political parties. The application must be submitted no earlier than the 19th day before Election Day and no later than 12:00pm the 3rd day before the election. Additionally, an absent voter who has a disability or is confined and who also is required to vote a provisional ballot due to a change of address or change of name may vote a provisional absentee ballot; no other type of absent voter may vote provisionally by absent ballot. For more information on absentee voting, see the Absentee Voting by Mail subsection below.

Additionally, polling places must be accessible to voters with disabilities. Specifically, polling places must be free of barriers that would impede handicapped voters, have a sufficient number of handicapped parking spaces, have nonskid ramps that lead to the entrance, and have doors that are at least 32 inches wide. The Secretary of State may specifically exempt certain polling places from these requirements upon certification from a board of elections that a good faith, but unsuccessful, effort was made to modify, or change the location of, such polling places.

Further, each polling location must have available for use at all elections at least one direct recording electronic voting machine or marking device that is accessible for individuals with disabilities, including nonvisual accessibility for the blind and visually impaired, in a manner that provides the same opportunity for access and participation, including privacy and independence, as for other voters.

Finally, the general rule is that voters may not occupy a voting compartment or use a voting machine for more than 10 minutes when all the voting compartments or machines are in use and voters are waiting to occupy them. However, this 10-minute time limit does not apply to any person who requires the use of a disabled-accessible voting machine.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-08)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.29 [link]

Secretary of State Directive 2014-18 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.23 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3506.19 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.08(A) [link]

Early Voting, Absentee Voting, and Other Ways to Vote

Early Voting/Absentee In-Person Voting

Does the state have early voting/absentee in-person voting?

Yes, in-person absentee voting is allowed.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-08)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.02 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.03 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.04(B) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.05(A) [link]

Where does early voting/absentee in-person voting take place?

The office of the county board of elections, or in some counties, only at a different location designated by the board of elections.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-04)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.10(C) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.05(A) [link]

Secretary of State Directive 2014-18 [link]

When does early voting/absentee in-person voting take place?

In-person absentee voting starts 29 days before Election Day (which is the day after the voter registration deadline). In-person absentee voting ends 2:00pm the Monday before Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-08)

Settlement Agreement 4/17/2015, pp. 4-6 (end of in-person absentee voting) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.10(B)(voter registration deadline) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.19(voter registration deadline) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code 3509.01(B)(3)(in-person absentee start date) [link]

What official chooses early voting/absentee in-person voting locations?

The county board of elections.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-08)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.10(C) [link]

Are lists of early voters/absentee in-person voters published? How?

To obtain this information, a person must file a public records request with the county board of elections, unless the county board chooses to publish it.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-08)

Per Ohio Secretary of State's office, September 2015. [link]

Absentee Voting by Mail

Can anyone vote absentee by mail without an excuse? If not, what excuses allow a voter to vote absentee by mail?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-08)

Ohio Rev. Code 3509.02(A) [link]

Deadline to apply for absentee ballot by mail

A mailed absentee ballot application must be received by the county board of elections by 12:00pm three days before the election. A hand-delivered application must be delivered by 6:00pm on the Friday before the election. Note that these deadline falls very close to the election; voters should apply well before the deadline to assure that they're able to receive and return their absent ballot in a timely manner.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-15)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.03 [link]

How does a voter apply for an absentee mail ballot?

Domestic absentee voters may use the state application form (Form 11-A). Alternatively, a voter may apply in writing to their county's director of elections; the application does not need to take any particular form, but it must contain the following information:
* The voter's name
* The voter's legal signature
* The address at which the voter is registered to vote
* The voter's birthdate
* One of the following items showing proof of identification: the voter's Ohio driver's license number, the last four digits of their Social Security number, or a copy of their current and valid photo identification, military identification, or a current (within the last 12 months) utility bill (including cell phone bill), bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that shows their name and current address (including from a public college or university). (Note: A voter cannot use a voter registration acknowledgment notice that the board of elections mailed to them as proof of identification)
* A statement identifying the election for which an absentee ballot is being requested
* A statement that the voter is a qualified elector
* If the request is for a partisan primary election ballot, their political party affiliation
* If the ballot should be mailed, the address to which it should be mailed

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-08)

Form 11-A [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.03 [link]

Can a voter make an online request for an absentee mail ballot?

Generally, no; absent ballot requests must be made by mail. However, overseas and military voters may e-mail a completed Federal Post Card Application to OMV@OhioSecretaryofState.gov

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-08)

http://www.sos.state.oh.us/SOS/omv/MRV/RegisterVoteAbsentee.aspx [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.03 [link]

Does a voter need to submit any supporting documentation or verification with an absentee mail ballot or absentee mail ballot application? If so, what is required?

An absentee ballot application must contain one of the following items showing proof of identity: the voter's Ohio driver's license number, the last four digits of their Social Security number, or a copy of their current and valid photo identification, military identification, or a current (within the last 12 months) utility bill (including cell phone bill), bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that shows their name and current address (including from a public college or university). (Note: A voter cannot use a voter registration acknowledgment notice that the board of elections mailed to them as proof of identification)

The absentee ballot must be placed inside the Indentification Envelope. Printed on the Identification Envelope is a form affitmation that the voter must fill out and sign. The Identification Envelope (sealed with ballot inside), is placed inside the return envelope, which is mailed to Board of Elections.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-08)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.03 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.04 [link]

Deadline to return absentee ballots

If an absentee ballot is returned by mail, it must be postmarked no later than the day before Election Day and received by the county board of elections no later than 10 days after the election. Note: Postmarked does not include a date marked by a postage evidence system such as a postage meter.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-08)

Ohio Revised Code 3509.05(B) [link]

Are there restrictions on who may return a voter's absentee mail ballot for them?

Yes. If the voter wishes to return the ballot by mail, the voter must personally mail it. If the voter wishes to return the ballot in person, it must be either personally delivered by the voter or delivered by the voter's spouse, father, mother, father-in-law, mother-in-law, grandfather, grandmother, brother or sister of whole or half blood, son, daughter, adopting parent, adopted child, stepparent, stepchild, uncle, aunt, nephew, or niece.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-09)

Ohio Rev. Code. § 3509.05 [link]

Are there any special emergency rules that allow a voter to vote absentee by mail if they are unable to make it to the polls at the last minute?

Yes. If a voter or their minor child is hospitalized because of an accident unforeseen medical emergency, the voter must submit a properly completed and signed request to their board of elections by 3 p.m. on Election Day. The voter's application must specify where, why, and when they or their minor child were hospitalized.

If the hospital is in the same county where the voter is registered, two representatives of the board of elections can deliver the ballot to them at the hospital, wait while the voter marks the ballot, and then return the ballot to the board office. Alternatively, the voter may include in their absentee ballot application a request that their unmarked ballot be given to a designated relative who can deliver the ballot to the voter in the hospital and return it to the board office. A designated relative may include the voter's spouse, father, mother, father-in-law, mother-in-law, grandfather, grandmother, brother or sister by whole or half blood, son, daughter, adopted parent, adopted child, stepparent, stepchild, uncle, aunt, nephew or niece.

If the hospital is outside the county where the voter is registered and no request is made for a relative to deliver the ballot, the ballot will be sent to the voter by mail, and may be returned by mail or in person by the voter or the voter's designated relative.

Additionally, an absent voter who has is confined to a hospital and who also is required to vote a provisional ballot due to a change of address or change of name may vote a provisional absentee ballot.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-08)

Secretary of State Directive 2014-18 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.08 [link]

Are lists of people who vote absentee by mail published? How?

To obtain this information, a person must file a public records request with the county board of elections, unless the county chooses to publish it.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-09)

Per Ohio Secretary of State's office, September 2015. [link]

Presidential-only ballots

Under federal law, any registered voter who moves out of the state after the 30th day before a Presidential election may vote for President and Vice President either in person at the voter's previous state of residence or using an absentee ballot from the voter's previous state of residence.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-15)

52 U.S.C. § 10502(e) [link]

Absentee Voting for Military and Overseas Voters

Who is eligible for military/overseas absentee voting?

The following persons may cast a military/overseas ballot if they resided in Ohio for 30 days before the election:

  • A person who is outside of the United States and who, before leaving the United States, was last eligible to vote in Ohio or would have been eligible had the person then been 18 years old or older, who may be considered a state resident, and who otherwise satisfies the requirements to vote in this state.
  • A person who was born outside of the United States, who may be considered a state resident, and who otherwise satisfies the requirements to vote in Ohio, if both of the following apply: (1) the last place where the person's parent or legal guardian was, or would have been, eligible to vote before leaving the United States is within this state; and (2) the person has not previously registered to vote in any other state.
  • A person who is qualified to vote in Ohio and is a member of, or the spouse or dependent of a member of, the active or reserve components of the army, navy, air force, marine corps, coast guard, merchant marine, the commissioned corps of the public health service, or the commissioned administration of the national oceanic and atmospheric administration, including but not limited to those on activated status.
Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-15)

52 U.S.C. § 20310 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3511.01 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3511.011 [link]

How do voters apply for a military/overseas ballot?

Military and overseas voters may request an absentee ballot by submitting one of the following applications in person or by mail, fax, or e-mail: (1) a Federal Post Card Application; (2) a domestic absent ballot application using Form 11-A, if the voter will be in Ohio during the absentee voting period; (3) Form 11-E, if the voter is already registered to vote (note that this form should be used by relatives applying on the voter's behalf); or (4) a letter that includes the following information about the voter (but requires no particular form):

  • Name;
  • Signature;
  • Address where registered to vote;
  • Birthdate;
  • A statement identifying the election for which the ballot is requested;
  • A statement that the voter is qualified to vote;
  • A statement that the voter is a military or overseas voter;
  • A statement of how long the voter lived in Ohio immediately preceding the commencement of armed service, immediately preceding the date of leaving to be with or near the service member, or immediately preceding leaving the United States; or a statement that the voter's parent or legal guardian lived in Ohio long enough to establish residency for voting purposes immediately before leaving the United States, whichever is applicable;
  • If the request is for primary election ballots, the voter’s party affiliation;
  • If the voter desires ballots be mailed, faxed, or e-mailed, then the address, fax number, or e-mail address to which they should be sent;
  • Either the voter’s driver’s license number, the last four digits of the voter's Social Security number, or a copy of current and valid photo ID, military ID, current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document other than a voter registration card.
Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-09)

http://www.sos.state.oh.us/SOS/elections/overseas/applyUOCAVA.aspx [link]

Form 11-A [link]

Form 11-E [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3511.02 [link]

Deadline to apply for a military/overseas ballot

A mailed absentee ballot application must be received by the county board of elections by 12:00pm three days before the election. A hand-delivered application must be delivered by 6:00pm on the Friday before the election. Note that these deadline falls very close to the election; voters should apply well before the deadline to assure that they're able to receive and return their absent ballot in a timely manner.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-09)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.03 [link]

Deadline to return the military/overseas ballot

If the voter is outside the United States, the ballot must be mailed no later than 12:01am on Election Day and received by the 10th day after the election. If the voter is inside the United States, the domestic absentee deadlines apply.

If a voter requested an absentee ballot by noon on the Saturday before the election, but have not received it, the voter may use the Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot. If the voter receives absentee ballot after submitting the Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot, the voter may vote on it and return it via mail or in person. If both the absentee ballot and the Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot are received by the 10th day after Election Day, the board of elections will only count the absentee ballot.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-09)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3511.09 [link]

http://www.sos.state.oh.us/SOS/elections/overseas/applyUOCAVA.aspx [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.05(B) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3511.11(D) [link]

On Election Day

Where do you vote in person?

Where do you vote in person?

At the polling place in the precinct where the voter is registered.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-09)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.29(A) [link]

What hours are the polls open on Election Day?

What hours are the polls open on Election Day?

6:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m. Voters who are standing in line at 7:30 p.m. may vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-09)

Ohio Rev. § Code 3501.32 [link]

In the Voting Booth

Can a voter bring children into the voting booth with them?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-09)

Interview with Secretary of State's Office [link]

Are employers required to give employees time off to vote?

Are employers required to give employees time off to vote?

Yes, an employer must allow an employee a "reasonable amount of time" to vote on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-09)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3599.06 [link]

Campaigning, Electioneering, and Recording Devices

Are there restrictions on campaigning/electioneering during early voting/absentee in-person voting?

Yes. Campaigning is forbidden within 100 feet of a polling place (as indicated by small U.S. flags), including at the boards of elections offices and other designated voting locations during the absentee voting period, or within 10 feet of a voter who is in line waiting to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-05)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.11(Z) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.30(A)(4) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.35 [link]

Are there restrictions on campaigning/electioneering on Election Day?

Yes. Campaigning is forbidden within 100 feet of the polling place (as indicated by small U.S. flags) or within 10 feet of a voter who is in line waiting to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-09)

Ohio Rev. Code 3501.30(A)(4) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code 3501.35 [link]

Can a voter wear a button or t-shirt with a candidate's name or logo on it into the polling place when they vote?

No; displaying campaign material is considered campaigning, which is forbidden in polling places.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-09)

http://www.ohioelectionstraining.sos.state.oh.us/popups/Glossary.aspx [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.35 [link]

Secretary of State Directive 2012-29 [link]

*NEW 1** Can a voter use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) inside the polling place or voting booth?

Yes. However, no one may use a device in a way that hinders or delays a voter’s ability to approach or leave a polling place.

Source (confirmed on: 10/17/2016)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.35(A) [link]

*NEW 1** Can a voter use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) inside the polling place or voting booth?

No, digital devices are not permitted.

Voters are prohibited from sharing or exhibiting a marked ballot, although it is unclear whether this prohibition extends beyond time voter is in the polling area. So local practices may vary.

Source (confirmed on: 10/15/2016)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3599.20 [link]

hio Rev. Code §§ 3501.35(A)(3)-(4) [link]

*NEW 2** Can a voter use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) outside the polling place but within the zone around the polling place where campaigning/electioneering is banned?

Yes. However, no one may use a device in a way that hinders or delays a voter’s ability to approach or leave a polling place.

Source (confirmed on: 10/17/2016)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.35(A) [link]

Who's at the Polls?

Can persons other than election workers observe inside the polls?

Yes. A political party supporting candidates in an election, and any group of 5 or more candidates, may appoint to the board of elections or to any of the precincts one qualified voter to serve as an observer during the casting of ballots and the counting of ballots. A committee supporting or opposing a ballot question may also appoint an observer, but if multiple committees with a position on the ballot question wish to appoint observers, the board of elections will determine which one committee may appoint observers. Committee observers may observe ballot counting only, not ballot casting, and may serve only on Election Day, not during the in-person absentee voting period.

In addition to observers, any person may enter a polling place to review the official registration lists posted throughout the day, so long as they do not harass others.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.23(C) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.21 [link]

What are observers inside the polls called in the state?

Observers.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.21(B) [link]

Does the state establish requirements to observe inside the polls?

Yes. Observers must be qualified voters in Ohio, but they do not need to be registered in the county where they are appointed to serve. Observers may not be candidates or uniformed peace officers, state highway patrol troopers, fire fighters, member of the armed services or militia, or any other uniformed person. Observers may be appointed only by a political party, a group of 5 or more candidates, or a committee supporting or opposing a ballot measure. Each of these groups may appoint only one observer to each precinct and the board of elections office, except that the person appointed to observe the casting of ballots can be someone other than the person appointed to observe the counting of ballots. The board may, under appropriate circumstances, allow a group to appoint more than one observer.

For a political party or group of 5 candidates to appoint observers, they must file an official notice with the board of elections that describes the names and addresses of the observers, and at what locations the observers will be serving, at least 11 days before Election Day--or, if the observer will serve during the in-person absentee voting period, at least 11 days before that period begins. Amendments to the notices may be filed until 4:00pm the day before the election or, if applicable, the day before the observer will serve during the in-person absentee voting period. Appointments made by a political party must be in writing and signed by the party's chairperson and secretary, and notices made by a group of 5 or more candidates must be in writing and signed by all 5 candidates. Observers must also present certificates of appointment to election officials. Observers appointed to a precinct may file their certificates of appointment with the precinct's voting location manager at the meeting on the evening before the election, or with the precinct's voting location manager on Election Day. Observers appointed to a board of elections office during the in-person absentee voting period may file their certificates with the board's director the day before or on the day the observers are scheduled to serve at the office.

A committee that supports or opposes a ballot measure must, no later than 4:00pm the 20th day before Election Day, petition their board of elections to be the committee entitled to appoint observers. If more than one committee that supports or opposes the same measure files a petition, the board must decide and announce by registered mail to each committee not less than 12 days before Election Day which committee wil be entitled to appoint observers. Committees appointing observers must then officially notify the board of elections at least 11 days before Election Day of the names and addresses of their observers and the locations they will serve, and the notice may be amended until 4:00pm the day before the election. Observers appointed by committees must present their certificates of appointment to the precinct's voting location manager before the polls close. However, no more than 6 observers may be appointed for any one election in any one precinct. If more than three measures are on the ballot, the committees that have appointed observers may agree on which appointees may serve as the 6 observers. If the committees cannot agree, the precinct officials must appoint the 6 observers from the appointees, in such manner that each side of the several questions be represented.

A board of elections may allow a party, group of 5 candidates, or committee to appoint more than one observer per location under appropriate circumstances.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Notice, appointment certificate, and committee petition forms [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.21 [link]

Secretary of State Directive 2012-21 [link]

*NEW 3* Can a poll observer use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) in the polling place?

Yes; however, such devices cannot not be used to take photographs, record videos, record conversations, engage in audible conversations, or otherwise disturb or interfere with the voting process.

Source (confirmed on: 10/17/2016)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3599.24(A)(5) [link]

Ohio Secretary of State (2016 Ohio Election Official Manual) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3599.24(A)(5) [link]

Are there other rules on what poll observers can or cannot do?

Yes. Observers may not campaign or indicate their preferences for candidates or ballot measures, they may not handle election materials, and they may not cause delay to persons attempting to vote. Additionally, observers may possess electronic and communication devices, but they must be set to produce no noise (vibration settings permitted); they cannot be used to take photos, video recordings, or transcriptions of conversations at the polling places; they cannot be used to have an audible conversation inside the polling place (texting, emailing, and other non-oral communications permitted); and they cannot otherwise be used to interfere with the election or to intimidate or risk violating the privacy of voters. However, absent harassment, they may be used to collect or transmit information from the registration lists posted throughout the day in each precinct.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.21 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3599.07 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3599.38 [link]

Secretary of State Directive 2012-21-2 [link]

Secretary of State Directive 2012-21 [link]

Provisional Voting and Voters at the Wrong Polling Place

When should a voter be offered a provisional ballot?

Under Section 203 of the federal Help America Vote Act of 2002, if a person claims to be a registered voter in the jurisdiction in which the person desires to vote and the person claims to be eligible to vote in a federal election, but the person’s name does not appear on the official list of eligible voters for the polling place or an election official asserts that the person is not eligible to vote, then that person must be permitted to cast a provisional ballot at that polling place. The person may cast the provisional ballot after executing, before an election official at the polling place, a written affirmation stating that the person is (1) a registered voter in the jurisdiction, and (2) eligible to vote in that election. Additionally, any person who votes in a federal election as a result of a federal or state court order, or any other order extending the time established for closing the polls by a state law in effect 10 days before the date of that election, may only vote in that election by casting a provisional ballot. Any such ballot cast must be separated and held apart from other provisional ballots cast for different reasons.

Under Ohio law, a voter must be offered a provisional ballot if:

  • The voter is not listed in the pollbook in the precinct where the voter claims to be registered;
  • The voter does not have (or is unable to provide) any of the forms of ID required;
  • The voter's name is marked in the pollbook as having requested an absentee ballot;
  • The voter's notification of registration was mailed and returned as undeliverable to the board of elections
  • The voter's eligibility has been successfully challenged, or the challenge or application hearing has been postponed until after the election;
  • The voter changed his or her name and resides in the same precinct as previously registered but has not yet provided proof of name change to the Board of Elections (may vote provisional ballot and complete and sign notice of change of name, or may vote on a regular ballot if voter provides to the precinct election officials proof of a legal name change, such as a marriage license or court order that includes the voter's current and prior names, and voter completes and signs a notice of change of name);
  • If the voter moves from one precinct to another within a county, moves from one precinct to another and changes their name, or moves from one county to another within the state, and the voter completes and signs the required change of name/address forms and statements; or
  • Precinct officers believe the voter's signature is not that of the person who signed the voter's name in the registration forms.
Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

52 U.S.C. § 21082 (federal law) [link]

If a voter casts a provisional ballot at the wrong precinct, will the ballot be counted?

Generally, no; if a voter casts a provisional ballot in the wrong precinct, the ballot will not be counted. However, if a voter casts a provisional ballot in the wrong precinct but in the correct polling location, and the election official fails to direct the voter to the correct precinct (as indicated by the election official failing to properly complete a required form so instructing the voter), the voter's provisional ballot must be remade on a ballot for the appropriate precinct to reflect the offices, questions, and issues for which the voter was eligible vote and for which the person attempted to cast a provisional ballot. The remade ballot must then be counted for each office and measure for which the voter was eligible to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-09)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.183 [link]

Following up on a provisional ballot

Within 7 days after Election Day, a voter who casts a provisional ballot because of not providing to the election officials any of the required forms of identification, or because the individual has been successfully challenged, must appear at the board of elections office and provide to the board the appropriate identification (meaning one of the required forms of ID required at the polls [see below section on Voter ID], the last four digits of the voter's social security number, or the voter's full Ohio driver's license number or Ohio state ID card number) or other additional information necessary to determine the voter's eligibility. However, no follow up is required if a voter who did not provide a proper ID wrote on the provisional ballot envelope either the last four digits of their social security number or their full Ohio driver's license or Ohio ID card number.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.18(A)(2) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.181(B)(7) [link]

Finding out if a provisional ballot was counted

At the time that a voter casts a provisional ballot, the appropriate local election official must provide in writing a toll-free telephone number the voter can call to determine whether the vote was counted, and if the vote was not counted, the reason that the vote was not counted.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.181(B)(5) [link]

Ballot Shortages/Voting Machine Malfunctions

What is the law or procedure on emergency ballots if a polling place runs out of printed ballots? Are handwritten/photocopied ballots allowed?

If precinct election officials do not have enough ballots, a board of elections must provide enough additional ballots to that precinct in a timely manner so that all qualified electors in that precinct who wish to vote at that election may do so. Handwritten ballots are not allowed, as all official ballots must be printed uniformly upon the same kind and quality of paper and of the same shape, size, and type.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.11 [link]

What is the law or procedure on emergency ballots if a voting machine breaks or malfunctions?

If direct recording electronic (DRE) voting machines malfunction, election officials must distribute optical scan paper ballots to voter. In each county using DRE machines, the board of elections must distribute backup optical scan paper ballots to election officials for this purpose (at a minimum, enough ballots for each precinct for 20% of that precinct's 2008 turnout).

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Secretary of State Directive 2012-27 [link]

Voter ID and Challenges

Voter ID

Who must show ID to vote?

All voters.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.18 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § Ohio Rev. Code § 3509.03 [link]

What ID is acceptable?

Acceptable identification must be issued by the United States government or the state of Ohio:

  • A current and valid Ohio driver's license;
  • A current and valid photo identification card, issued by the U.S. government or the State of Ohio;
  • A military ID;
  • A copy of a current utility bill (including internet and phone bills), bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document (other than a notice of election or a voter registration notification sent by a board of elections) that shows the voter's name and current address.

An ID is current if either (1) it has an expiration date on it that has not passed, or (2) it was issued within one year of Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Revised Code 3505.18 [link]

Secretary of State Directive 2008-80 [link]

Is a student ID an acceptable form of identification?

Yes, it is considered an acceptable type of government document ID so long as it is issued by a public school, is current, and shows the voter's name and current address.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Secretary of State Directive 2008-80 [link]

Does the address on the ID have to match the address at which the voter is registered?

It depends on what type of ID the voter presents. No match is required if the ID the voter presents is an Ohio driver's license, Ohio photo ID card, or military ID. If the voter uses an Ohio driver's license or Ohio photo ID card and it does not contain the voter's registration address, a poll worker must record the last 4 digits of the voter's driver's license or Ohio ID card number in the polling place's records. If a voter uses a military ID and it does not contain the voter's registration address, the voter may vote so long as the poll workers can ascertain the voter's identity is accurate and the voter is otherwise eligible.

All other forms of ID must contain the voter's current address, and the address must match the voter registration's address.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Secretary of State Directive 2008-80 [link]

If a voter has no ID, are there alternatives such as an oath or witness?

Voters who do not provide proper ID may vote a provisional ballot. If the voter writes on the provisional ballot envelope the last four digits of their social security number or their full driver's license or Ohio ID card number, they will not need to provide further identification information after election day for the provisional ballot to count. If a voter who lacks a proper ID does not write any of these numbers on the provisional ballot envelope, then the voter must appear at the board of elections office within 7 days of the election and present proper ID, or provide one of these numbers, for the provisional ballot to count.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.18(A) [link]

Do elections without federal offices on the ballot (such as off-year gubernatorial elections) have different ID requirements?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.18 [link]

Challenges to Voters at the Polling Place

Who can challenge a voter at the polling place?

Precinct election officials only. (Challenges made by non-election officials must be made to the board of elections office at least 20 days before Election Day.)

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.24(pre-election challenges) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.19(pre-election challenges) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.20 (regular/special election challenges) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3513.19 (primary election challenges) [link]

What are the allowed reasons on which a voter can be challenged at the polling place?

At the polling place, a voter may challenged for the following reasons:

  • The person is not a qualified voter, including the person not being a U.S. citizen, not having resided in Ohio for 30 days immediately before the electionm not residing in the precinct they are attempting to vote, or that the person is not of legal voting age
  • The person received or was promised something of value for their vote
  • For primary elections, the person is not a member of the political party whose ballot the person is attempting to vote.
Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.20 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3513.19 [link]

Is there a requirement for the challenger to provide cause or evidence?

No. The only provision addressing cause states that a precinct election official has a duty to challenge a voter who the official doubts is legally entitled to vote in a primary election.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3513.19 [link]

How does a voter defend their eligibility to vote if they are challenged?

In a primary election, a challenged voter must state in writing, under penalty of election falsification, before one of the precinct officials, their name, age, residence, length of residence in the precinct, county, and state; that the voter is affiliated with and supports the principles of the political party whose ballot the person desires to vote; and give all other facts necessary to determine whether the voter is entitled to vote in that primary election. If the challenged voter refuses to provide this statement, or provides the statement but a majority of precinct officials find that the information provided or other evidence shows the voter is not qualified or not affiliated with the political party whose ballot they wish to vote, the voter will be given a provisional ballot. Otherwise, the voter will be given a regular ballot.

In a general or special election, a challenged voter must, under penalty of election falsification, provide a written statement that answers a precinct election official's questions about the voter's citizenship status, residency status, or age to aid the officials in determining the voter's eligibility. If the challenged voter refuses to fully answer any quesiton, gives an answer that contradics their registration information, refuses to sign the statement, or for any other reason a majority of precinct election officials believe the voter is not eligible to vote, the voter will be given a provisional ballot. Otherwise, the voter will be given a regular ballot.

If the challenged voter is given a provisional ballot, the voter must appear at the board of elections offce within 7 days after the election to provide necessary information proving their eligibility to vote (see Provisional Ballots subtopic above).

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.181(B)(7) [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3505.20 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3513.20 [link]

State and Local Election Officials

The State Election Authority

Who/what is the state election authority?

Secretary of State

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.04 [link]

Current official

Jon Husted

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

http://www.sos.state.oh.us/ [link]

E-mail

None. However, there is an online contact form at http://www.sos.state.oh.us/SOS/elections/ContactUsElections.aspx

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

http://www.sos.state.oh.us/SOS/elections/ContactUsElections.aspx [link]

Phone

(614) 466-2655

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

http://www.sos.state.oh.us/elections.aspx [link]

Address

180 East Broad Street
Columbus, OH 43215

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

http://www.sos.state.oh.us/SOS/directions.aspx?page=1634 [link]

Local Election Authorities

What local election official(s) are in charge of major state-level elections (such as the even-year November general elections)?

Board of Elections.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.06 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.11 [link]

What is the county-level election official?

Board of Elections.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.06 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.11 [link]

What is the municipal-level election official?

None.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.06 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3501.11 [link]

Contact information for local election authorities

http://www.sos.state.oh.us/SOS/elections/boeDirectory.aspx

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

http://www.sos.state.oh.us/SOS/elections/boeDirectory.aspx [link]

The Voter File

Voter File Basics

National Voter Registration Act (NVRA) Disclosure Law

Section 8 of the NVRA requires that each State shall maintain for at least 2 years and shall make available for public inspection and, where available, photocopying at a reasonable cost, all records concerning the implementation of programs and activities conducted for the purpose of ensuring the accuracy and currency of official lists of eligible voters, except to the extent that such records relate to a declination to register to vote or to the identity of a voter registration agency through which any particular voter is registered.

Acquiring a Voter File

Under state procedure, who may acquire a voter file?

Members of the public.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

http://www2.sos.state.oh.us/pls/voter/f?p=111:1 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.13 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.26 [link]

Who is the state-level contact for acquiring a voter file?

Robin Fields, Business Operations Analyst for the Ohio Secretary of State

Phone: (614) 644-0770

E-mail: RFIELDS@SOS.STATE.OH.US

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

http://www2.sos.state.oh.us/pls/voter/f?p=111:1 [link]

How much does the state charge for the file?

The file is provided for free on the Secretary of State website.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

http://www2.sos.state.oh.us/pls/voter/f?p=111:1 [link]

What format is the file available in?

Comma delimited file format.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

http://www2.sos.state.oh.us/pls/voter/f?p=111:1 [link]

Use of the Voter File

Does the state have restrictions on commercial use of the voter file?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Per Secretatary of State's office, September 2015 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.13 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.15 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.26 [link]

Does the state have restrictions on non-commercial use of the voter file?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-10)

Per Secretatary of State's office, September 2015 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.13 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.15 [link]

Ohio Rev. Code § 3503.26 [link]